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Interviews

Virginia R. Black, EdD

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Virginia R. Black, EdD
Amy A. Hackney, PhD
Larry Locker, PhD
Edward W. L. Smith, PhD
Daniel G. Webster, PhD
Kathy Wiegand, PhD
Rebecca M. Murray, PhD
James L. Pugh, PhD
Dr. Paul Kleinginna
Dr. Janie Wilson
Janice N. Steirn, PhD
Dr. William McIntosh, PhD
Dr. Lisa Ferdinand, PhD

Virginia R. Black, EdD















1.What are your degrees and from where did you earn them?







B.A. of English from Agnes Scott College







M.Ed in English education from Georgia Southern University







EdD in School Psychology from the University of Georgia







2.When did you come to GSU to teach and why?







Came in 2003 after retiring from the state of Tennessee to teach and help take care of her mother







Have you taught at other colleges or universities, if so, what courses did you teach?







Dyersburg State Community College located north of Memphis, Tennessee. Taught introductory psychology, lifespan development, educational psychology, psychology of women, creative thinking







Adjunct at the University of Memphis. Taught educational psychology, urban sociology, sociology of gender







3.What courses do you teach at GSU and how are they different from those taught at other universities?







The biggest difference is that at Dyersburg the introductory psychology course is taught over the course of 2 semesters







4.What was the teacher to student ratio when you arrived here?







Could not say







5.What courses were offered when you started teaching at GSU and how has that changed till the present?







Course offerings have stayed about the since her starting







6.What were students; attitudes toward psychology when you started teaching here and how have they changed over the years?







If there is a change, not only at GSU but at previous colleges it may be that the interest is shifting more toward money and away from the service aspects of psychology







7.To what do you attribute these changes, if any?















8.What was the male to female ratio in the psychology department when you started?







Notices a trend in the growing number of women in the field, and could say with some certainty that over half of the psychology majors are female. But as far as Introductory Psychology is concerned, about half and half.







9.How has the department changed since Georgia Southern became a university?







Came in 2003







10.What is your favorite course to teach?








Likes all classes equally







11.From what you can tell, what are your students; favorite courses to take?







Could not say that she really noticed a particular favorite







12.Do you see a correlation between classes that your students find favorable and higher grades?







Students tend to like the classes that they do well in more than the ones in which the do not do well







13.What types of research have you been or are you currently involved in?







While at Dyersburg, most of the emphasis was on teaching







Past research included research on training pre-service teachers, and research on test preparation techniques and research on mothering in the southeastern U.S.







14.Have you had or do you currently have a private practice?







no







15.If so, what kind of patients did you or do you see?







n/a







16.What are some things you would like to see happen in the psychology department in the next five years?







Get the PsyD program running







17.Are there any psychology courses not offered at GSU that you would like to see offered or that you would like to teach?















18.Do you see the number of psychology students or an interest in psychology growing at GSU?















19.What is your response to the possibility of the offering of a PsyD program at GSU?







It would really be beneficial to the rural areas not only in Georgia but in other areas to get some trained psychologists in a position to help those that need it.







20.What is the best thing about being a psychology professor at GSU?







Seeing students change as people as they deal with the various issues in psychology and the satisfaction that come from watching a student unfold and begin to finally get it. Adding that this is not limited to only teaching psychology courses







21.What is the worst thing about being a psychology professor at GSU?







The more emphasis that is placed on research, the less time and emphasis can be placed on teaching the students







22.What advice would you give to a student interested in pursuing a degree in psychology?







Jump into things and expect that the more difficult something is, the better it prepares you for what comes next. Learn to embrace difficulty.











Contact:
Ben Kellum
mrben12002@yahoo.com